Top 5 Reasons for the Right to Read

We believe literacy is a human right that belongs to all people. 122 million children across the globe cannot read. LitWorld is changing this. 

Here are our Top 5 Reasons to support the right to read and in this way impact millions of people in the world who are hungry for it. The right to read is an information-empowering, communication-delivering, people-connecting, comfort-inducing, opportunity-ensuring tool for sustainable change.

Top 5 Reasons for the Right to Read

  1. Because zip codes shouldn’t stop kids from having the same chance to become super readers. LitWorld works across communities in the United States and around the world in 25 countries to bring afterschool and summer solutions to closing the reading gap.
     
  2. Because helping kids read is a powerful, sustainable investment that gives young people the power to change their own lives. Did you know that without literacy skills individuals are less likely to participate in democratic processes and have fewer chances to fully exercise their civil rights? Through year-round participation in LitWorld LitClubs, kids gain the skills they need to be school, career and civic ready. 
     
  3. Because kids who read are happier. Through our dynamic LitCamp program (reaching 60,000 kids and counting!) kids get a whole new kind of summer school, one that teaches them to read and also brings them joy. When kids don't get to read what they care about during the summer, they very often fall up to two grade levels behind! LitWorld is solving for this.
     
  4. Because when girls get to readthey are far more likely to get to go to college and be economically independent. So, LitWorld focuses 2/3 of our programming on women and girls. The HerStory Campaign helps us achieve this goal.
     
  5. Because a kid who reads is going to grow up to be a citizen who cares about his or her community. LitClub members report more active engagement and leadership in their communities after just one year in a LitClub. We seek to expand our programs not only for the benefit of one child’s right to read, but also for what that ripple effect does for everyone else.

We invite you to honor someone who has inspired YOUR reading life. Could it be your first grade teacher, your mom, your grandfather, or a best friend? You can give kids who are most hungry for the right to read the chance to fulfill their biggest potential.

Make a donation of any amount in honor of the person in your life who inspired you to read, write and follow your dreams. 

 

Global G.L.O.W. and LitWorld Co-Host Second #HerStoryCampaign Twitter Chat on October 6th

The HerStory Campaign, created and led by nonprofits LitWorld and Global G.L.O.W, invites you to our second twitter chat in collaboration with UN Women. Join us on October 6th, at 9am EST on Twitter to discuss how we can act on the stories that women and girls to ensure #Planet5050 as we lead up to the International Day of the Girl and Stand Up for Girls.

Come together with the #HerStoryCampaign to continue our powerful conversation on how to create sustainable and impactful change.

Stand Up for HerStory - Twitter Chat
Date: October 6, 2016
Time: 9 am EST

Handles: 
@litworldsays
@globalgirlsglow

Hashtags: 
#herstorycampaign
#planet5050

Questions

We will be asking the following questions throughout the hour to engage in thoughtful conversation around Standing Up for HerStory. We encourage you to have your answers ready!

  1. What inspires you to stand up for girls?
  2. What does positive change look like for the women and girls in your community?
  3. What will you do this week to show a woman or girl her story matters?
  4. How can we create more inclusive environments for women and girls to become leaders in the world?
  5. Who is a woman or girl in your life who inspires you and why?

Sample Q&A

@litworldsays: Q3. What will you do this week to show a woman or girl her story matters?

@litworldsays: A3. Join us on Oct 11 to #StandUp4Girls--use our free activity packets to share your story: ow.ly/eQVg304L77S #herstorycampaign

21st Century Literacy: Technology for All

Monica Nimmagadda, Research & Development Intern

I opt for print books instead of a Kindle or an iPad. I take notes on a Five Star notebook. My calendar and to-do lists are in a small planner. As a computer science major, a lot of my thinking, planning, and coding is even done on paper. There are many instances in which I use the “old way” over new technology, and while technology permeates all areas of my life from my daily agenda to my future career, I have the privilege of choosing how I get to use it.

The fact is, we live in a digital world. Today’s times are supposed to be better, more innovative, faster and easier than before. That may be true. Technology opens doors and allows all of us to become more efficient and effective in our daily lives. And for those who pursue careers in the tech industry, the socioeconomic benefits hopefully multiply. But while anyone can become skilled in using technology regardless of race, gender, or socioeconomic status, the opportunities we have to gain these skills aren’t available to everyone.

A masterful use of technology begins with exposure and comfort at a young age. A BBC study found that kids who play educational games on tablets are able to grasp theoretical concepts much quicker than their counterparts. Early exposure to technology is extremely beneficial, but limited access creates an unfair playing field for the schools and districts that cannot afford the technology and don’t have the resources to integrate it into their curriculum.

Which brings me to the question: Is digital literacy, or the ability of an individual to responsibly, appropriately and effectively use technology, a right or privilege? Digital literacy is so much more fundamental than programming or data analysis--it allows us to gain independence, collaborate with others, and includes the skills we use to access, manage, integrate, evaluate, create and communicate information.

Despite its importance, we move technology to the back burner in our efforts to teach literacy to children around the country and the world, focusing most immediately on traditional reading and writing. Meanwhile, the technology learning and achievement gap between those with a range of literacy tools and those without, widens.

It’s time to recognize the importance of technology in our efforts to get every child fully ready for the 21st century.

Using technology isn’t just an opportunity to open doors for potential jobs, it’s also a powerful way to communicate and share stories. LitWorld recognizes this and is one of few education nonprofits to have a program, Story21, which focuses on storytelling through technology across generations.

Story21 is a family program that combines reading, writing, storytelling, technology, and community. It’s important for kids to be comfortable to read and write using technology just as it is using pen and paper. As an intern, I went through the surveys we give the kids and parents after the program. The results are extremely positive. With the introduction and mastery of iPads and apps, kids and parents are able to use technology to enhance their learning together. Teaching the parents new skills creates a better environment for their kids to embrace technology and move forward with it.  

It’s time to start allowing technology into education, for every child. More kids learning to grow with technology means more opportunities for those kids in the future, and greater innovations for our whole world as we benefit from the ideas and minds of every person, everywhere. We need to give all kids the chance to not only understand the digital world happening around them, but to participate, contribute and change that world with the power of their own stories.

News for You: LitCamps Make Transformational Change to Build a World of Super Readers

LitCamps From Oakland to Atlanta

Let’s start with the numbers: 55,000 kids, 3,000 classrooms, 118 cities in 32 states across the U.S. Add it all up, and you have LitCamp--the summer program developed by LitWorld in partnership with Scholastic. The message we've received from parents and teachers around the country is clear: LitCamp is truly revolutionary. It is an exciting and dynamic solution to the catastrophic "summer slide" which can seriously interfere with a child's growth as a reader.

We have created LitCamp with a combination of exceptional lessons in reading, writing and storytelling combined with superb children's books, carefully selected by LitWorld to reflect the wide and diverse world of childhood. LitCamp serves students from kindergarten through fifth grade.

LitCamps were adopted by the New York City Department of Education as a key part of the “Summer in the City” Initiative, and by many other districts and cities across the country including Oakland, Austin, and Richmond.

LitCamp Across the Globe

LitCamps spread across the world this summer. From Colombia to Haiti to Rwanda, LitKids wrote stories, read books, formed new friendships, and grew their academic skills through storytelling. From Nepal:

"What happens when you bring nearly a hundred girls together for LitCamp? Empowerment and Magic. They learned to share, to be brave, to be open, to be helpful, and to be committed to improve themselves and their communities. These little girls found that they have big personalities and big dreams, and that they can work together to make those dreams a reality."

While the cost per child is low, the benefits are profound. Summer has ended, but we can keep summer dreams alive by getting ready for next summer and by helping many more children attend a LitCamp. Please consider making a donation to LitWorld to turn every child into a Super Reader!

Stand Up for Girls on October 11th

507 million women and girls worldwide cannot read and write.

Stand Up for Girls mobilizes people of all genders, from all corners of the world, to advocate for a girl’s right to share her story and change the world. By learning to read, write, and share stories, girls understand that their words have the power to create monumental change at the community and international level.

The HerStory Campaign was created and led by two nonprofit organizations, LitWorld and Global G.L.O.W., and works to amplify the powerful stories of women and girls in their communities and around the world. On October 11th, the annual United Nations International Day of the Girl, we invite you to Stand Up and join our global community as we take action, highlighting the stories of girls from the world’s most marginalized communities. By listening to girls’ own stories and acting on them, we can build a better world together.

This year we will celebrate our strengths by standing up for women and girls around the world who inspire us to be strong.

How will you Stand Up for Girls on 10.11.16?

Download one of our activity packets below to be a part of the movement.

The Community Packet is for anyone who would like to host event in their communities for a large group.

Download the Community Packet.

The Classroom Packet is for anyone who would like to celebrate in their classroom or a school setting.

Download the Classroom Packet.

The small group or individuals packet is for people who would like to celebrate in their homes or offices, on their own or in a small group.

Download the Individual Packet.